The Battalion Headquarters in the foreground are mirror images of one another.

The Battalion Headquarters in the foreground are mirror images of one another.

October 26, 2010

Two New Battalion HQs Achieved LEED Gold Certification

The U.S. Green Building Council has awarded LEED Gold Certification to the two Battalion Headquarters in the Whole Barracks Renewal, Phases 2F2 and 2G, project at Schofield Barracks. The design/build project by Mason Architects and Nan, Inc., includes offices, classrooms, conference rooms, arms vaults, shower/locker rooms, and storage areas.

The project earned the Gold rating for its use of water- and energy-reducing systems; high-efficiency HVAC equipment; materials that were renewable, recyclable, and/or emitted low levels of volatile compounds; for its treatment of the site, and for many other measures that promote healthy living but do not lead to ozone depletion or global warming.


Milo Court Wins Award at Parade of Homes

This model is atypical; other models have two living units and two garages.

October 8, 2010

Milo Court Wins Award at Parade of Homes

At the Parade of Homes Gala on October 6 in the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the Building Industry Association of Hawai'i presented the award in the Multi-Family Low Rise Division II ($299,001 - $399,000) to Milo Court at Kehalani - Ho'omalu. Designed by Mason Architects and constructed by Towne Development of Hawai'i, these two 2000-square-foot homes are built on the hills above Wailuku, Maui, and have views of Haleakala and the West Maui Mountains. Each features a great room, gourmet kitchen, three bedrooms and two baths over a two-car garage.

Like this model, the other 46 two-story duplexes in Milo Court follow the natural slope and contour of the site, configured for upslope, downslope, or level lots to catch the views and tradewinds.


Bishop Museum's Hawaiian Hall, after restoration. It was built by Charles Bishop to house the Hawaiian arti- facts bequeathed to him by his wife, Bernice Pauahi Bishop.

Bishop Museum's Hawaiian Hall, after restoration. It was built by Charles Bishop to house the Hawaiian arti- facts bequeathed to him by his wife, Bernice Pauahi Bishop.

July 31, 2010

Hawaiian Hall Restoration wins AIA Award of Merit

At its gala at the Hawaiian Prince Hotel in Waikiki on July 29, the AIA Honolulu Chapter announced that Mason Architects has won an Award of Merit for its restoration of Hawaiian Hall, Bishop Museum. The eight Awards of Merit and three Awards of Excellence were drawn from a record number of 55 entrants.

In his presentation at the gala, Glenn Mason explained that Hawaiian Hall is a rare extant example of a Victorian museum, designed by Ripley and Dickey in 1903. The goal of the restoration project was to solve climate control, lighting, and access problems while preserving the historic integrity of the building and its early Hawaiian artifacts.


Hart Wood: Architectural Regionalism in Hawaii

This book was published by the University of Hawai‘i Press in 2010.

July 9, 2010

Hart Wood: Architectural Regionalism in Hawaii

The Alexander and Baldwin Building, the First Church of Christ Science, the Board of Water Supply Administration Building, the Chinese Christian Church -- these icons of Honolulu's architectural legacy were designed by Hart Wood, the first architect in Hawai‘i to meld Asian and Western forms and the subject of a new book published this year by University of Hawai‘i Press.

Besides providing an analysis of how Wood's designs fit into a territorial and national context, Hart Wood familiarizes the reader with a previously little-known inventory of his residential portfolio and shows it to be an important part of developing regionalism in Hawaiian architecture.

The richly illustrated book was written by Don Hibbard, the State's historic preservation officer from 1981-2002; Glenn Mason, the president of Mason Architects, Inc.; and Karen Weitze, an architectural historian from California who has worked on preservation projects here and across the country.


Hulihe'e Palace after the repair of damage from the October 2006 earthquake.

Hulihe'e Palace after the repair of damage from the October 2006 earthquake.

July 7, 2010

Historic Hawai‘i Foundation Presents Five Preservation Honor Awards to Mason Architects

MAI received five awards from the Historic Hawai‘i Foundation at the awards presentation ceremony on April 22. These awards honor "preservation projects that perpetuate, rehabilitate, restore or interpret the state's architectural, archaeological and/or cultural heritage." MAI shared two of the awards with contractor Alan Shintani and developer Ohana Military Communities for the rehabilitation and conversion of the two-story duplexes built in the Makalapa neighborhood of Pearl Harbor in the 1940s. We also shared an award with the County of Kauai's County Clerk and Department of Public Works, Building Division, for the restoration of the Kauai County Building - Annex 1, originally designed by Hart Wood (more). And MAI won awards for repairing damage from the October, 2006 earthquake to two historic buildings on the Island of Hawaii: Kalahikiola Church (more) and Hulihe'e Palace (more).


Glenn Mason and Gary Chock inspected the hangar to assess its condition and to determine how to preserve it.

Glenn Mason and Gary Chock inspected the hangar to assess its condition and to determine how to preserve it.

March 23, 2010

Can this hangar be saved?

In October, 2009 Glenn Mason and Gary Chock, structural engineer, flew to Midway Atoll to evaluate the condition of Seaplane Hangar, Building 151, and recommend measures to stabilize and preserve it. The hangar was designed by Albert Kahn, Inc. in 1940 and was scarcely finished when it was hit and partially burned during the December 7, 1941 attack on Naval Air Station Midway Islands. It was reduced to half its size after the attack and was hit again by bombs and shells during the Battle of Midway in June, 1942. The half hangar continued to house seaplanes until the late 1960s. The harsh marine environment and lack of repair have caused the hangar to deteriorate badly. The hangar is historically significant as part of the Battle of Midway National Memorial. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, current stewards of the National Memorial/Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, also need the building to house main-tenance vehicles and supplies. As a result of the study the FWS has decided to do work sufficient to stabilize the structure while retaining its historic integrity.